Can You Put Ice In A Kitchenaid Food Processor? (Will It Break)


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Kitchenaid food processors are a great complement to the cooking abilities of any chef.

Whether you’ve been cooking for a decade or are just beginning to dip your toes into the culinary waters, this trusted brand of kitchen appliances offers a wide range of useful tools to help you get the job done.

But can you put ice in a KitchenAid food processor?

No… don’t do it! This is very dangerous and should not be done because you can chip the inside of the bowl and it cost a lot of money to get a replacement.

I’m saying don’t do it but that doesn’t mean it can be done. You just throw some ice cubes in and use the pulse function a few times and you will have crushed or shaved ice. But…

It will just make your KitchenAid a lot more expensive because you will have to buy a new bowl and a new blade.




Other People Do It… Aren’t You Over Reacting?

Look, you might get away with it from time to time but is it worth the risk?

One of the most expensive repairs you can make to your Kitchenaid food processor is to replace the motor after you’ve broken it by running ice through it.

The metal blades on the Kitchenaid food processor were not meant to crush ice, and the motor will overheat and break down the blades along with the motor.

Just because you can do something like making salsa or hummus in a food processor doesn’t mean you should. Food processors aren’t magic; they can’t replace tools that are better suited for specific tasks.

The simple fact of the matter is if you want to crush ice buy a blender.

A blender is designed to handle ice while a food processor simple is not!




So Why Can I Put Ice In A Blender And Not A Food Processor?

Blenders and food processors both uniquely handle tasks for any in-home chef: a blender can whip up smoothies and shakes in a pinch, while a food processor can grind, chop, slice, and knead various ingredients to make flavorful dishes.

A food processor and a blender are both kitchen gadgets designed to chop, grate, and mix food.

The main difference is that a blender contains a blending element (usually in a base) that rotates around a jar, while a food processor has a stationary blade that chops food held in a container.

I like how KitchenAid explains it on this page.

The simplicity of it all is that if you want to make something to drink, drizzle or dip use a blender. Alternatively, if you want to make something you can eat with a spoon or a fork use a food processor.

Great explanation!




Ice Will Ruin The Blades

Ice is a rock-hard substance and putting it in your food processor will blunt the blades.

You might be thinking a blender is no different so why can I blend ice without worrying about the blades?

The simple fact of the matter is a food processor is designed to more things like chop, grind, and slice. So if you dull the blades you will definitely feel the effects when you try to use your food processor what it is designed for.

You won’t experience the same pain with a blender because you need it to chop, grind, and slice.




In summary, technically you can use a Kitchenaid food processor to crush ice. It is plenty powerful enough and does the job just fine.

But it comes with a risk.

For starters, it is not recommended by the manufacturer.

You have paid quite a hefty sum to have a food processor because it is one of the most versatile appliances you can have in the kitchen.

It will potentially damage the blades and the processor itself.

If all you want to do is crush ice in the future no worries. You might never notice a thing.

But the moment you try to use it as a food processer and try to slice, chop, or grind it won’t perform as it should. Using ice in your food processor will most certainly over time ruin your food processing experience and cost you more money in the long run.

You may also be interested in… Is KitchenAid A Good Brand? (Stand Mixers Are Superior To Others)